Best Time-Lapse Videos Ever

Calling all inspired creators—submit a photo or a time-lapse and/or slow-motion video for chances to win amazing prizes including Ultrabooks inspired by Intel and your video featured in an online ad. Click here to enter and win! Special thanks to The Awl for sharing this post.

Here are five of the best time-lapse videos so far from The Awl.

“TimeScapes” The Movie 

TimeScapes: Rapture 4K from Tom Lowe on Vimeo.

Director and cinematographer Tom Lowe slept outside with his camera for 250 nights while recording time-lapse footage of the American Southwest for his movie “TimeScapes.” He filmed an actual bear and a Native American performing a nighttime tribal dance. After watching this you’ll want to spend more time outdoors at night, preferably in the desert.

Watch Vegas Grow

 

When NASA isn’t sending a rocket-powered sky crane to determine whether Mars was ever habitable, they’re monitoring the urban sprawl in Las Vegas from 1972 through 2012. Because if we could make Vegas happen, we could probably make Mars happen.

Earth: Seen from ISS Expeditions 28 & 29 2011

And when the sun crests the curve of the horizon at the end, you learn how to say ‘Holy shit this is the most totally mind-blowing thing I have ever seen in my life’ in Japanese. Or something pretty much like that.” Astronauts also make great photographers.

Cloud Cool

Epic Skies from Tony Rowell on Vimeo.

This video is kind of spooky and beautiful and compelling in the way “Game of Thrones” is kind of spooky and beautiful and compelling. The landscapes look like another world, but it’s just Earth. “Game of Thrones” isn’t real, you guys. Cloud nerds will geek out.

“The Electric Radiance of Los Angeles at Night”

Los Angeles hasn’t looked this pretty or appealing since the opening sequence of “The Hills.” Just substitute spoiled rich girls in their bikinis for well-lit architecture and neon point-of-view shots. And lots of headlights, obviously, because this is Los Angeles.

Obscure reference alert! Georges Melies would be proud.

 

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The Awl, a New York City-based web concern established in early 2009, intends to encourage a daily discussion of the issues of the day–news, politics, culture (and TV!)–during sensible hours of the working week. An “awl,” by the way, is a “pointed tool used for punching small holes,” often utilized in wood and leather craft. Megan L. Wood is a freelance writer based in New York City. She grew up in the rural Midwest but has lived and worked on five continents and speaks a smattering of three foreign languages. Her writing and guides about travel, culture, and food has been featured on Salon, Slate, Vice, National Public Radio, Ethical Traveler, The Huffington Post, and others. Currently, she’s writing her first travel memoir.

 

Megan L. Wood / The Awl
Megan L. Wood
Megan L. Wood is a freelance writer for The Awl, based in New York City. She grew up in the rural Midwest but has lived and worked on five continents and speaks a smattering of three foreign languages. Her writing and guides about travel, culture, and food has been featured on Salon, Slate, Vice, National Public Radio, Ethical Traveler, The Huffington Post, and others. Currently, she’s writing her first travel memoir.
Read More From Megan L. Wood